Employment law

Employment contract solicitors

If you've been offered a job, it's worth checking that your rights will be respected, both during and after you've been employed. Or if your existing contract is changing, you need to know that the changes are fair.

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Employment law solicitors

Slater and Gordon's experienced solicitors are here to advise you on all aspects of employment contracts. Call us on 0330 107 6495 or contact us and we'll call you.

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Can I get my employment contract reviewed?

If you're about to start a new job, it's often worth asking an employment contract solicitor to review the contract before you sign on the dotted line. That's because some employers and their contract lawyers use a variety of tactics to ensure that contracts are weighted in favour of the employer, rather than the employee.

We've the experience and the expertise to look at any proposed employment contract and advise you on whether it's in your best interests to sign it or to ask for changes to be made.

This involves checking that your employment contract complies with all legal requirements and a detailed analysis on specific terms relating to your benefits package, including termination provisions. We'll also review any restrictive covenants to make sure they aren't too restrictive. Sometimes 'non-compete' covenants may be included in your contract to stop you from working with a competitor or setting yourself up in competition with your employer after you've left their company.

Importantly, we've the ability to react quickly to contract review requests; providing speedy and concise advice about specific points in your contract and helping you to negotiate better terms where necessary.

To speak to one of our experienced employment solicitors about a contract review, call us on 0330 107 6495 or contact us and we'll call you.

Can you help me with an employment contract dispute?

Employment contract disputes arise for a number of reasons, with the most common being that your employer wishes to change the terms of your contract. This is only legal when it's done with your consent. If your employer wishes to change the terms of your contract, they have to consult with you or your representative, explain the reasoning behind the proposed changes and listen to any alternative solutions you put forward.

Where your employer fails to get agreement and changes your contract without your consent, you may have the right to refuse to work under the new terms. Alternatively, where the new terms are impossible for you to accept, you may be entitled to treat the changed terms as a breach of contract and resign, before taking action for constructive dismissal.

Naturally, refusing to work or resigning in protest are both very serious steps. You should ideally always take advice before resigning and our experienced employment solicitors are here to guide you if your contract of employment is changed without your agreement. If this has happened to you, call us on 0330 107 6495 or contact us and we'll call you.

How does a change of ownership affect my contract?

In some cases the company you work for may be sold or transferred to another owner. When this happens, it's quite common for your new employer to attempt to impose new contracts on you and your colleagues. Fortunately, these contractual rights are protected by law under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, also known as TUPE.

You can find out more about TUPE here.

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