Employment law

Racial discrimination at work

The Equality Act 2010 says that you cannot be discriminated against because of your race, nationality, ethnic origin or colour. If you believe that you've been treated unfairly in the workplace because of your race, talk to one of our friendly employment law solicitors today.

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All you need to know about racial discrimination

Slater and Gordon's experienced solicitors are here to help if you've been discriminated against because of your race. Call us on 0330 107 6495 or contact us and we'll call you.

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What is race discrimination?

Under the terms of The Equality Act 2010, its unlawful for an employer to discriminate against any employee on the basis of their race, nationality, ethnic origin or colour. This discrimination can take many forms: from employers refusing highly qualified individuals an interview because of their racial origins or nationality, to colleagues making racial comments to you, about you, or even simply within your earshot in the workplace.

Sadly, while behaviour like this is completely unacceptable, it does still happen in some workplaces. If you believe you've been discriminated against on account of your race or nationality - either while you were at work or during the recruitment process - speak to one of our sympathetic and experienced employment discrimination solicitors today.

What sorts of race discrimination are there?

It goes without saying that any form of discrimination based on race, nationality, ethnic origin or colour is unacceptable. However, it's worth noting that race discrimination in the workplace does fall into four main categories:

• Direct discrimination: This is where you're treated less favourably than someone of a different race is treated or might be treated. This might happen during the recruitment process when you're discriminated against and don't even get an interview because of a foreign-sounding name on your application form, perhaps because an employer thinks that you might not fit in with the existing workforce.

• Indirect discrimination: This can happen due to rules that affect all workers but would in effect rule out members of certain ethnic groups, such as if beards were forbidden, unless there's a genuine business requirement for this certain rule.

• Victimisation: This is where you're subjected to negative treatment because you've made a complaint in the workplace about any form of race discrimination such as racial comments, attitudes or stereotypes relating to your ethnicity or nationality or have supported someone else who has complained about this kind of behaviour.

• Harassment: This is where you've suffered unwanted conduct related to race which has the purpose or effect or violating your dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment.

If you believe you've been discriminated against at work - or when applying for work – because of your race, nationality, ethnic origin or colour, we're here to help. Speak to one of our experienced employment discrimination solicitors today.

What can I do about race discrimination?

If you've been subjected to race discrimination at work, or during the recruitment process, you need to act quickly. You only have three months, minus one day, from the date of the last discriminatory act to start a claim at an employment tribunal.

Before you can do this, you will first need to send details of your claim to the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS). They will establish whether your employer will agree to 'early conciliation', which takes up to a month, and is added onto the three-month period if necessary. Where ACAS conciliation fails, we're here to help you to make a claim at an employment tribunal.

If you believe you've been unfairly discriminated against, victimised or harassed on the grounds of your race, nationality, ethnic origin or colour, it's time to speak to one of our experienced solicitors. Call us on 0330 107 6495 or contact us and we'll call you.

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