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Three Quarters of People Want Drink-Drive Limit Lowered

By Media Executive

Three Quarters of People Want Drink-Drive Limit Lowered

The research, commissioned by Public Health England, was part of the British Social Attitudes Survey of more than 2,000 adults.

The survey follows suggestions from earlier in 2016 for the Government to follow the example of Scotland by lowering the limit in England and Wales.

In England and Wales the current legal limit for drink-driving is 35 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath. In Scotland the limit was brought down two years ago to 22 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath.

Conservative MP Andrew Jones, a transport minister, previously said in February: "It is important to base our decisions on evidence and the Scottish experience will be crucial to that before we consider any possible changes to the limits in England and Wales."

The new research also found more than half of people disagree with the assertion that "whatever the law says, most people are safe to drive after a pint of beer".

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, leading liver doctor and chairman of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said: "As drink-driving costs lives, affects road safety and places significant pressure on the emergency services, it is no surprise the public are keen to see a lowering of the drink-drive limit.

"This is a measure that has the full support of road safety charities, emergency services and motoring associations.

"We urge the Government to listen to the public and adopt these evidence-based measures that will save lives and make our communities safer."

Alcohol’s effects on driving ability include slower reaction times, with the brain taking longer to receive messages from the eye as well as difficulties processing information and sending instructions to the body’s muscles.