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Unprosecuted Black Cab Rapist Claims Should be Reconsidered, Lawyers Demand

Unprosecuted Black Cab Rapist Claims Should be Reconsidered, Lawyers Demand

Almost 100 cases against black cab rapist John Worboys should be reconsidered by the CPS to assess if he should face further prosecutions, lawyers for victims said today.

It is of fundamental importance that The CPS agrees to this request to ensure Worboys’ victims, and indeed the greater public, have their faith restored in the criminal justice system.

Lawyers from Slater and Gordon and Birnberg Pierce wrote to the Crown Prosecution Service, asking for 93 cases that Worboys was not prosecuted for to be reassessed.

Worboys faced prosecution for allegations made by 12 women.

The letter, from Richard Scorer of Slater and Gordon and Harriet Wistrich of Birnberg Pierce, said: “As you would expect, our clients were shocked and dismayed to learn of Worboys’ imminent release. The decision of the Parole Board, the manner it was communicated to victims (most found out through the media), and the seeming failure to put in place proper measures to protect victims following his release are all matters of grave concern to our clients; we are raising these matters with the appropriate authorities.

“However the purpose of this letter is to formally request that the CPS undertake a thorough review of all available evidence against Worboys to determine whether he can be prosecuted in respect of further offences.”

The letter goes on to point out that: “Worboys was only prosecuted in respect of a small fraction of the allegations against him: 12 complainants out of some 105 in total whom, we understand made complaints to the police.

“It is understood that the intention was that ‘the indictment was not overloaded and that the case was as simple as it could be to present to a jury’. In the course of the trial an additional four allegations emerged which were linked to Worboys. Furthermore, in the wake of media observations following the conviction an additional 45 incidents were reported of which 18 were linked to Worboys. The total number of allegations linked to Worboys upon the closure of the investigation was 105.”

The lawyers then added that victims were told Worboys would “not be coming out for a long time” and, as a result, it was not necessary to prosecute the serial rapist with another trial.

The letter goes on: “To the extent that this was the CPS’s expectation at the time, this has clearly not happened and this justification for not bringing further prosecutions has fallen away.”

The letter ends: “We therefore formally request that the CPS make a public commitment to reconsidering the evidence in all Worboys cases with a view to further prosecution.”

Richard Scorer, a specialist abuse lawyer at Slater and Gordon, which represented 11 of Worboys victims in a successful civil claim, said: “It is crucial that the CPS reconsiders all of the cases Worboys was not prosecuted for to assess whether he should face further charges. Our clients were led to believe their attacker would not be walking free for many many years, so there was no point in prosecuting him for their allegations. This clearly has not happened and we are left with dozens of women fearing for their safety and feeling sorely let down by the very system that is meant to protect them. It is of fundamental importance that The CPS agrees to this request to ensure Worboys’ victims, and indeed the greater public, have their faith restored in the criminal justice system.”