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Vaginal Mesh Campaigner Dies of Sepsis Following Controversial Implant

By Media Executive

Vaginal Mesh Campaigner Dies of Sepsis Following Controversial Implant

A woman who campaigned for vaginal mesh to be banned as a treatment for prolapse has died – just a week after health watchdog NICE recommended the same.

Mum-of-two Christina Brajcic passed away as a result of sepsis following a four-year struggle caused by a TVT vaginal mesh implant.  

The women affected by these products underwent what should have been relatively straightforward procedures which would have resolved troublesome symptoms, usually after childbirth, but some have been left in chronic pain and had their lives altered forever.

It is believed that Ms Brajcic, 42, of Ontario, Canada, is the first woman to die in the vaginal mesh scandal after developing a resistance to antibiotics, having taken so many during her ongoing battle.

Conservative MP, Alec Shelbrooke, had previously called the implant “the new thalidomide”.

On November 15, Ms Brajcic, who detailed her health battle on social media in recent months, posted on Facebook: “Funny how after going septic and almost dying now I’m getting respect and being treated well by doctors. All it took was dying to get better care and better pain management. I will take it...it’s better than fighting for my care.”

Ms Brajcic's death follows new guidance from the UK-based National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to recommend the controversial implants should no longer be used as a routine treatment for prolapse.

The mesh scandal was brought to the nation’s attention in April when hundreds of women who had received the implant complained of severe pain.

Australian watchdogs also banned the use of vaginal mesh implants for prolapse last week after a review found “the benefits do not outweigh the risks”.

Julia Reynolds, a medical negligence lawyer at Slater and Gordon Lawyers, said: “The women affected by these products underwent what should have been relatively straightforward procedures which would have resolved troublesome symptoms, usually after childbirth, but some have been left in chronic pain and had their lives altered forever.

“Sepsis is becoming so much more common and is a condition the NHS will have to get to grips with.

“We are likely to see huge numbers of patients affected in the future by this condition which develops rapidly, and if not recognised and treated quickly, is life threatening, and can lead to long term organ damage for those who do survive.”