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Sex discrimination laws see first female freeminer named

Sex discrimination laws see first female freeminer named

The first female freeminer - an ancient title given to miners in the Forest of Dean who earn the right to work personal plots - has been named after she successfully argued that sex discrimination laws were breached when she was refused the honour.

Elaine Morman, 52, works at the Clearwell Caves mine, a tourist attraction showcasing the region's iron-mining industry, as well as producing ochre, the BBC reports.

In order to become a freeminer, a man must have been born in and reside within the Hundred of St Briavels - which today is the Forest of Dean and each parish touching its boundary - and have worked for a year and a day in the mine within this specified location.

Ms Morman appealed to her MP when it became apparent she would not be afforded the title, with the matter later being raised in the Commons and now the Forestry Commission Gavellers have registered her.

Deputy gaveller John Harvey noted that the case had created "significant disquiet" among freeminers, with feedback suggesting that a number of people were unhappy with it.

Contact our employment solicitors on 0800 916 9060 or email enquiries@rjw.co.uk if you would like advice on any employment matter

Posted by Daniel Stevens

Contact our employment solicitors on 0800 916 9060 or email enquiries@rjw.co.uk if you would like advice on any employment matter