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People with mental illnesses 'face disability discrimination'

People with mental illnesses 'face disability discrimination'

People with mental illnesses are still victims of discrimination at work, it has been discovered.

A survey conducted by national campaign Time to Change found that 56 per cent of those polled revealed they would not employ someone with a mental illness even if they knew they were the best person for the job, the Guardian reports.

Among the reasons cited for such reluctance were fears that the illness would cause the candidate to be unreliable and concerns that workers with such problems would lead to a fall in team morale.

Doctors, people working in the emergency services and teachers were identified among the most likely to be hindered in securing employment if they have a mental illness.

Time to Change chief executive Sue Barker said: "We need to be able to have a discussion about mental health problems in the workplace and to put an end to discriminatory attitudes that prevent people from working."

Describing itself as England's "most ambitious" programme to end mental health discrimination, Time to Change is funded by the Big Lottery Fund and Comic Relief and is evaluated by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College, London.