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Medical Negligence Principal Lawyer Paul Sankey on Cancer Claims

New research suggests a 40% fall in deaths from Cancer among people in their 50s over the last 40 years. According to Cancer Research UK the number of people in this age group dying from Cancer dropped from 21,300 in 1971 to 14,000 in 2010. The most significant drops were in Stomach Cancer and Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (75%). In men there were significant falls in Lung Cancer and Testicular Cancer whilst for women there were also falls in the rates of Stomach, Bowel and Cervical Cancer.
 
A number of factors probably contributed to these improvements. First among them will be fewer people smoking. Other factors are probably better diagnosis and improved treatment.
 
However there are still suggestions that the rates of detection of Cancer are lower than among our European neighbours. A number of studies have shown that Cancer is often diagnosed here later than it could have been. This is not necessary because of failures by our doctors although it may be that GPs could improve their recognition of symptoms needed for referral to undergo further tests. It is possible that patients are generally slower here than elsewhere to report symptoms.
 
We currently act for a number of clients whose Cancer Claims were brought because their Cancer was diagnosed too late because of Medical Negligence where doctors have failed to recognise suspicious signs, wrongly reassured patients or even misinterpreted tests. In a number of these cases X-rays, MRI or tissue samples from biopsy scans were misinterpreted: it was only on review after diagnosis that the mistake was noticed. For some patients the consequences can be tragic.
 
News of improvements in Cancer rates is therefore welcomed. However there is still a lot to do to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

Contact us today to talk about your delayed or misdiagnosed Cancer Claim. Please call 0800 916 9049, email enquiries@rjwslatergordon.co.uk or use the short online enquiry form.

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